FAQ's

These units are VERY HEAVY and will require a few people to manoeuvre it. We recommend using protective gloves and appropriate footwear when unpacking and installing your fire box. Before deciding where to put your Freestanding fire box, make sure that there are no obstructions around the unit or above it that will restrict the flue or cowl rotation.
  1. Unpack your fire box and check for physical and cosmetic damage straight away. Any physical damage incurred during transport, should be reported immediately so it can be addressed through the delivery company’s insurance. Damage identified later will be assumed to have occurred during installation or during use.
  2. Your fire box is an extremely durable and handmade by leading South African manufacturers, but it has traveled thousands of miles to get here. Minor scratch marks and blemishes are to be expected and should be addressed with matt black heatproof touch-up paint( in case of the mild steel products ).
  3. Remove all contents and accessories from inside the fire box (particularly the heavy ember maker), this will make it easier to manoeuvre. 
  4. Place the bottom stand in your preferred, safe and solid position and then place the fire box on top the stand, aligning the pre-drilled holes in the bottom panel of the box. We suggest that you secure/bolt the stand into the ground to ensure there is no unwanted movement of the entire unit.
  5. Secure the fire box to the bottom stand by using the bolts and nuts supplied.
  6. For additional safety, we highly recommend that you bolt the unit into the ground, especially if completely exposed in windy area’s
  7. If not already pre assembled- Fit the cowl base on one end of the flue pipe aligning the pre-drilled holes and secure using the bolts and nuts (supplied)
  8. Fit the flue pipe on top of the  fire box,(supporting firmly) aligning the pre-drilled holes and secure flue bolts and nuts supplied.
  9. It is advisable to secure/bolt the unit to the solid surface it is placed on.
  10. We suggest you store your units in a dry place as far as possible. Positioning of the Freestanding units should also be considered carefully- placing under a roofed structure is highly advisable.

IMPORTANT : Before you cook on your fire box for the first time, you need to cure/season it. To do this, simply light a small fire at first, to allow the fire box to heat up gently. You will notice some odour initially which is normal. In addition to allowing the paint to cure, this process is also important for built-in models to allow any surrounding brickwork to be cured also.

The mild steel fire box should be maintained with heat resistant matt black BBQ or Stove paint.

NOTE : Whilst the guarantee on this unit covers manufacturing standards, it cannot be extended to installation. Please ensure that you employ a reputable and competent person to do the installation. 

EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY : Whilst every care has been taken in formulating these instructions, no responsibility whatsoever will attach to and/or claim lie against, the manufacturer and/or distributor of the appliance from the use of, or because of any failure to follow the whole or any part of the instructions and/or because of incorrect information herein and/or any omission here from.

These units are VERY HEAVY and will require a few people to manoeuvre it. We recommend using protective gloves and appropriate footwear when unpacking and installing your fire box. 

Unpack your fire box and check for physical and cosmetic damage straight away.

Report any physical damage incurred during transport. Damage identified at a later date will be assumed to have occurred during installation or use.

 
Your Fireboks is extremely robust and handmade by experienced South African Braai (Fire Box)manufacturers, but it has traveled thousands of miles to get here. Minor scratch marks and blemishes are to be expected. Scratches found on the black fire box range should be touched up with the matt black heat proof touch-up paint. For future ongoing maintenance, widely available BBQ or Stove paint should be used. 
 

It is preferable to fire bricks and cement around the body of the unit, as it is more resistant to heat. Insulation material such as a fire blanket or fireproof insulation sheets is also recommended as it protects the cement between the bricks)

The flue should alos be insulated in line with standard national guidelines.

  1. Remove all contents and accessories from inside the fire box (particularly the heavy ember maker), this will make it easier to move.
  2. Construct your support walls for your Fireboks to a resting height of between 700mm – 900mm.(Keep in mind that your grid (at the lowest) is about 200 mm higher than the lintels on which the fire box will rest.
  3. Position the unit, cover sides, back and top with a fire blanket insulation / fireproof insulation and brick in the unit. The insulation should be held in position with adhesive tape. To protect the paintwork on your fire box flange and inside body we advise that the chimney outlet and the flange is covered with any form of protection during construction. A lintel or slab underneath the unit is not required but may be used. If you decided to utilize the space underneath the fire box for wood or any other combustible materials it is recommended to build a concrete slab underneath the fire box.
  4. To ensure that the top door stays open when the firebox is used, make sure that none of the finished brickwork protrudes past the flange of the fire box.
  5. You should not store combustible material near your fire box.
  6. The inner dimensions of the chimney must not be less than the flue outlet opening size on the top of the unit.
  7. Chimney height is critical for a proper draw at least 2 meters are recommended.
  8. Use standard flashing material and procedures to waterproof chimney stack . Lead flashing has been found most successful. This is essential to protect your fire box against rain water.
  9. A cowl (rotating or fixed)  will keep rain out of the flue in order to prevent the unit from rusting
  10. Lights or electric motors must be installed by a qualified electrician

IMPORTANT : Before you cook on your Fireboks for the first time, you need to cure/season the fire box. To do this, simply light a small fire at first, to allow the fire box to heat up gently. You will notice some odor initially which is normal. In addition to allowing the paint to cure, this process is also important for built-in models to allow any surrounding brickwork to be cured also.

Exposed components of the mild steel range(cowl and cowl base and in some cases flue pipes) must be painted with enamel or rust resistant paint after installation. Use colour to match roof tiles and repaint regularly. Interior components of the mild steel black fire box can be maintained with heat resistant matt black BBQ or Stove paint.

NOTE : Whilst the guarantee on this unit covers manufacturing standards, it cannot be extended to installation. Please ensure that you employ a reputable and competent body to do the installation. This will protect your interest.

EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY : Whilst every care has been taken in formulating these instructions, no responsibility whatsoever will attach to and/or claim lie against, the manufacturer and/or distributor of the appliance from the use of, or because of any failure to follow the whole or any part of the instructions and/or because of incorrect information herein and/or any omission here from.

Failure to follow the whole or any part of the instructions which leads to damage to your appliance, will make your guarantee invalid.

  • (‘Paint’ in this manual, only refers to heat resistant black stove paint, to be used on Mild Steel fire boxes)
  • Attend to any sign of water leakage onto or inside the fire box as this could accelerate corrosion of the product. As soon at it appears, surface corrosion should be treated immediately and touched up with paint. (more about this elsewhere in FAQ’s) 

  • Whilst mild steel and stainless steel are very durable materials and widely used for bbq appliance manufacture, its surface can be damaged by misuse or by the application of unsuitable cleaning materials or methods.
  • To clean the external surfaces, use only a non abrasive detergent such as washing up liquid (soapy water) to remove accumulated fat or grease. Never use oven cleaner or any caustic cleaner, abrasive cleaning solvents, scouring powders, metal polish, silverware cleaners or any type of scouring pads as this could damage the surface.
  • To clean the Grids remove from the appliance and soak in hot deter-gent solution. Grids may be cleaned with scouring pads. Rinse well in clean water before placing the parts back into the appliance.
  • Do Not use aggressive chemicals.
  • Don’t Use oven cleaners.
  • Initiate your new fire box with a small and slow fire. The purpose of this first initial fire is to burn and clear away any residual paint and factory debris. You will notice a little excessive smoke which will indicate that the debris is clearing. The second purpose is to allow the fire box and surrounding structure to “cure”. As the fire box and surrounding structure heats it will expand slightly and then settle again once it cools down.
  • Where applicable, use the ember maker to start your fire. Place the logs in the ember maker and your firelighter directly underneath the ember maker. In no time you will have embers ready to use as hot coals.
  • Do not make your fire on the very base of your fire box as this will directly transfer extreme heat to the structure. Warping of the cooking structure can be caused.
  • When it is time to clean the fire box, the ash (once cooled down completely) should be swept into the ash drawer through the ash trap in the ash pan. The ash pan can then be emptied into a disposal container or mixed into your compost heap.
  • Besides the normal, post bbq cleaning that is required, servicing of gas BBQ’s and gas components should be carried out by a qualified technician on a regular basis.

Early treatment of Surface Corosion:

With the changeable weather and levels of rain experienced in Ireland and the UK it would be wishful thinking to believe there will not be an element of corrosion/surface rust on certain BBQ units that are exposed to the elements. You have already made a big investment and no different to your cooking units in your kitchen, these braai’s will need care and maintenance to get the best return on your investment.  

Luckily there are a few precautionary and maintenance steps that can be taken to prevent or at least limit the level of corrosion that might be experienced.

Regular maintenance and early intervention is key to longevity (more detail on this below in FAQ’s). Keeping your braai dry as much as possible is the first step towards limiting corrosion- this could be done by positioning it under a roofed structure, pergola or indoors where possible.

Our mild steel units are available in two ranges- the Classic range (2.5mm general thickness and 3mm in the ‘hot’ areas) and the Home Fires range (3mm general thickness and 3.5mm in the ‘hot’ areas)

Both are shot blasted and rust treated to help protect against the elements. Mild steel units’ paint work and general appearance can be refreshed by applying black heat resistant bbq/ stove paint to keep it looking fresh.  

There is a misconception and generalisation that all stainless steel do not rust. There are very may grades of stainless and depending on the grade, stainless steel can rust when left untreated or ill managed, it will also  discolour under high heat- turning into a deep dark blue colour when exposed to the high temperatures, like direct fire or heat from charcoal/gas.

The most common grades of Stainless steel used to produce bbq’s would be 304 and 430 grade. (more about this elsewhere in FAQ’s).

For those who prefer stainless steel we suggest the 304 Stainless Steel range, especially on coastal areas or when the unit will be exposed to very bad weather- these would be our most durable units in terms of holding up against corrosion. 

Stainless steel is a tough, long lasting, durable metal. However, under certain conditions it can be subject to surface corrosion, which if left unattended could lead to rust. This is natural reaction, usually between the surface of the steel and its surroundings, but the good news is there are many things you can do to prevent this reaction or clean the rust off the steel using the correct cleaning procedure.

The same goes for Mild Steel, the upside of mild steel is that corrosion/rust marks can be sanded off with sandpaper and painted with heat resistant oven paint- giving it a new fresh look.

When surface rust first appear, WD-40 is one of the best rust treatments as it is so simple and quick. Simply spray the affected area with WD-40 and scrub it with a cloth or clean wire brush (ensure that no residue from the wire brush is left behind as this could ironically lead to further surface rust!)

If you do not have access to WD-40 then there are a few household items that can be used to treat surface rust:

Lemon Juice and Baking Soda
This tried-and-true method of cleaning oxidation off stainless steel surfaces calls for the mixing of equal amounts baking soda and lemon juice to once again form a paste. This paste would then be used to completely cover the rust spots on the metal surface, before using a damp sponge to wash the gunk away. If this doesn’t completely clean off the oxidation, apply the paste again and this time let it sit for around 30 minutes before removing. If you don’t have lemon juice, lime juice will work just as well in the mixture.

Soap and a potato
Dish soap and potato are also valuable household items when it comes to cleaning rust. Cut a potato into two pieces and apply dish soap on the cut end. This will ensure that there is a chemical reaction between the end and rust, which will make it easy to wipe off.

Put the potato on the surface of the metal object and let it stay for a couple of hours. If you need to apply again, simply cut the used end off and put dishwashing soap on the fresh end. After that, place it again on the metal surface for longer.

We have a variety of materials from which to choose- mild steel, 430 stainless steel and 304 stainless steel.

The differences in steels are brought about by their alloying materials. Mild steel contains carbon as the alloy, whereas stainless steel includes chromium. The changes brought about by chromium to the internal structure of the steel result in properties which gives stainless steel its name: very high corrosion resistance and a surface which does not stain or tarnish easily.

Stainless steel may/can change colour once it encounters heat. There are different grades of stainless-steel materials available. Some stainless steels are more suitable for coastal areas than others. Some of our fire boxes are made using 430 stainless steel. 430 stainless steel is known as the entry level stainless steel.  430 stainless steel works very well with heat but will still change colour on the areas where direct heat has been promoted.

We recommend 304 stainless steel for coastal areas or when the unit will be heavily exposed to bad/wet weather- 304 is our most durable grade steel when it comes to being rust resistant.

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